FOSSconnect


FOSS Newsletter Staff | March 20, 2006 | Assessment

Assessing Science Knowledge (ASK) is a project based at the Lawrence Hall of Science that was funded by the National Science Foundation in the summer of 2003. The purpose of the project is to design an assessment system for grade 3–6 FOSS modules that produces valid and reliable evidence of science achievement in an active-learning science environment.

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FOSS Newsletter Staff | March 17, 2006 | Professional Development

Newport-Mesa USD in southern California had a problem, as many districts do—how to train their teachers to be effective FOSSilitators.

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FOSS Newsletter Staff | March 17, 2006 | Science News

We experience the three basic forms of matter—solid, liquid, and gas— every dayas we go about our lives. But scientists have described other forms of matter that are unusual, to say the least. In January 2004 scientists produced a new form of matter. They call the new form "fermionic condensates."

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Guest Contributors | March 15, 2006 | FOSS in Schools

We received the following letter from Mary Humphrey, describing the art-related extensions she uses with her second-graders when she teaches the FOSS Insects Module.

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Guest Contributors | March 15, 2006 | FOSS in Schools

It all started innocently enough. Mrs. H had ordered crayfish for the FOSS Structures of Life Module she was planning for her third-grade class. I was going to use them after her. I had already extended my Structures of Life Module to include raising silkworms and hatching chicks, as well as growing beans hydroponically. But I had not used crayfish before. When Mrs. H was through, I inherited her crayfish.

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Guest Contributors | March 14, 2006 | In Memoriam

Sheila Dunston, my friend and colleague, passed away suddenly in August 2005. She died far too young, but she left a legacy of individual accomplishment and systemic reform.

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Guest Contributors | March 01, 2006 | FOSS in Schools

One by one reports emerge that underscore our nation’s failure to find or invent ways to close the achievement gap in mathematics, science, and technology (NSF,2004). This gap between the achievement of historically underrepresented populations and other groups must be closed aggressively, comprehensively, realistically, and affordably.

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