Erica Beck Spencer | September 29, 2015 | Science News

Professor Ashok Gadgil is conducting work that will help millions living in extreme poverty and dangerous situations, such as in Darfur refugee camps.

Read more
Erica Beck Spencer | September 22, 2015 | Science News

Starting in September of 2015, all fourth-grade students and their families will receive free admission to all federal lands and waters for the entire year.

Read more
FOSS Newsletter Staff | September 20, 2010 | Science News

Since the Deepwater Horizon explosion the night of April 20, 2010, we are all exposed to news about the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in the newspaper, on TV, and on the radio. It is difficult for young and old alike to comprehend the extent of this disaster, especially when we are miles away from its direct effects. It is a complicated and even scary situation, especially for children.

Read more
FOSS Newsletter Staff | March 04, 2010 | Science News

The life zone, or habitable zone, of a star is the region around a star where there may be planets that could have liquid water and support life. The distance of that zone from the star depends on how big and hot the star is.

Read more
Guest Contributors | March 13, 2008 | Science News

Delta was recognized for its involvement in classrooms, college programs, and professional development opportunities and for having a large impact on science education specifically in the elementary classroom.

Read more
Guest Contributors | March 07, 2008 | Science News

To aid state agencies, public safety officials, K–12 teachers and students, and other decision makers in viewing weather information in a timely fashion on their personal computers, the Oklahoma Climatological Survey (OCS) develops easy-to-use visualization software and provides it free of charge for non-commercial use. OCS’s most recent weather data display tool is called WeatherScope.

Read more
Guest Contributors | March 03, 2007 | Science News

In the FOSS Populations and Ecosystems Course for middle school, students use Mono Lake, an important alkaline lake, as a simple ecosystem case study. They study the functional roles of populations to construct a food web.

Read more
Sue Jagoda | March 03, 2007 | Science News

So, what happened to Pluto? Why was it "demoted" from being a full-fledged planet to the category of dwarf planet? Why do we now name only eight planets in the Solar System? And, why does it matter?

Read more
FOSS Newsletter Staff | March 17, 2006 | Science News

We experience the three basic forms of matter—solid, liquid, and gas— every dayas we go about our lives. But scientists have described other forms of matter that are unusual, to say the least. In January 2004 scientists produced a new form of matter. They call the new form "fermionic condensates."

Read more
Guest Contributors | September 23, 2002 | Science News

A pond in Crofton, Maryland, has become the home of a non-native, predatory fish called the northern snakehead.

Read more
Guest Contributors | March 11, 2002 | Science News

The most obvious ideas are not always clear. Take aerogel for instance, a transparent, smoky blue substance that's been especially manufactured to bring home a piece of a comet, among other things.

Read more
Guest Contributors | September 14, 2001 | Science News

Paracelsus was a 16th century physician who was the first to realize that a chemical can be safe at a low dose but poisonous, or toxic, at a higher dose. He came up with this hypothesis: The dose of a chemical determines the type and severity of the body's response to it.

Read more